About

DH Curation Guide

a community resource guide to data curation in the digital humanities

What is this?

The DH Curation Guide is a compilation of articles that address aspects of data curation in the digital humanities. The goal of the DH Curation Guide is to direct readers to trusted resources with enough context from expert editors and the other members of the research community to indicate to how these resources might help them with their own data curation challenges.

Each article provides a short introduction to a topic and a list of linked resources. Structuring articles in this way acknowledges the many excellent resources that already exist to provide guidance on subjects relevant to curation such as data formats, legal policies, description, and more.

Want to know more about what data curation is? Head to the FAQ about data curation.

Who wrote the articles?

An initial set of articles have been penned by contributing editors who are authorities in their fields. You can read more about them on the contributing editors page. Every article has been submitted to a rigorous editing process guided by managing editors Trevor Muñoz and Julia Flanders. This process ensures that the article presents accurate, up-to-date information and adheres to the Guide’s purpose, tone, and style.

The DH Curation Guide has received generous support from:

The Institute of Museum and Library Services

The Center for Informatics Research in Science and Scholarship, GSLIS

The Graduate School of Library and Information Science (GSLIS)
at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

Project History

The DH Curation Guide grew out of a needs analysis study of data curation at digital humanities centers conducted by the Data Curation Education Program for the Humanities (DCEP-H) at the Graduate School of Library and Information Science (GSLIS), University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign, which has been generously funded by a grant from the Institute of Museum and Library Services (RE-05-08-0062-08). In the course of interviewing directors and senior-level staff of centers engaged in digital research in the humanities, project team members identified a clear need for a collection of reviewed, trusted resources for basic information on issues related to data curation. The DH Curation Guide is an initial contribution toward meeting that need.

Coordinated by the Center for Informatics Research in Science and Scholarship (CIRSS), the DCEP-H program extends the existing Data Curation specialization within the ALA-accredited master’s program at GSLIS to include humanities data. Encompassing curriculum design, internships, a fellowship program as well as other activities in addition to the needs analysis survey, DCEP-H is intended to prepare information professionals for the unique challenges of working with humanities research data.

Project Staff

Trevor Muñoz, Editor, University of Maryland. Editor bio »
Julia Flanders, Editor, Northeastern University. Editor bio »
Megan Senseney, Project Coordinator, Data Curation Education Program for the Humanities, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

Past project staff

Robin Davis, Editor and Developer, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
Pei-Han Hsu,
Programmer
James Little,
Programmer, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
Larry S. Jackson,
Programmer, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
Allen Renear,
Principal Investigator, Data Curation Education Program for the Humanities, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
Kevin Trainor, Project Coordinator, Data Curation Education Program for the Humanities

Technical notes

The Guide is currently a research project under development. Things may not display or behave as intended. We would appreciate any feedback sent to dhcuration [at] gmail.com.

Licensing notes

Each contribution to the DH Curation Guide is copyright by the editors and is published under a Creative Commons Non-Commercial Attribution license, with the goal of encouraging broad reuse that is in the educational and community-building spirit of the original publication. Below we describe the rationale underlying the licensing terms in greater detail; if you would like to reuse or remix this material and are not certain whether your proposed use is non-commercial, please contact us. We are open to collaboration.

The main aspects of our licensing policy are as follows:

We strongly encourage all forms of educational, academic, and community reuse of Guide materials, including the following: online and printed course or workshop materials, inclusion in other resource guides, libguides, or in reference materials to be used in a library or other educational setting, and distribution as part of a conference, training session, or other informational or educational event.

The DH Curation Guide license is for non-commercial re-use, but we construe the term “non-commercial” broadly rather than strictly. In particular, we regard as non-commercial the following kinds of reuse: use in educational or professional development settings such as conferences or training sessions, even if a fee is charged for attendance or to cover materials (e.g. the cost of duplication), inclusion in other online resources, even if these resources accept advertising, as long as no fee is charged to readers for access to the material. For these uses, you do not need to contact us to obtain further permission.

How to cite

Contributors to the DH Curation Guide have contributed their time and expertise to the development of this resource. For any form of reuse, we ask that you provide attribution that represents both the author, the DH Curation Guide, and the URL for the chapter, as follows:

  • Allen Renear, “Text Encoding”, DH Curation Guide: a community resource guide to data curation in the digital humanities, [URL].

Each article includes a citation at the bottom of the page.

Contact us

If you have any comments or questions, please email us at dhcuration [at] gmail.com.